Resource Directory /

Marion Resources

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  • Special Education Assessment Tip Sheet and Resource List

    Family members and early care and education providers are adults who notice when the children in their care may have disabilities or developmental delays and would benefit from special education services.

    The Illinois Early Learning Project’s Special Education Assessment tip sheet series is a helpful tool for learning more about the steps in that process. The IEL also provides an Assessment for Special Education resource list.

  • NubAbility Athletics Foundation and Camps

    The NubAbility Athletics Foundation is a non-profit organization that encourages, inspires and instructs limb different youth by getting them out of the stands, off the bench and into mainstream sports. NubAbility offers a wide variety of limb-different sports camps nationwide for youth athletes who are congenital, traumatic or medical amputees from around the world.

    NubAbility offers camps for a wide range of ages and interests. Options include:

    • All sports
    • Deep sea fishing
    • Competitive shooting
    • Equestrian
    • Basketball
    • Archery and more
  • Envision Illinois Domestic Violence Resources for People with Disabilities

    Envision Illinois is a statewide collaborative project addressing domestic violence against people with disabilities and Deaf people. Envision Illinois provides various resources designed for all people, families, agencies and organizations working to ensure that survivors with disabilities have equal access to healing, safety and justice.

    Envision Illinois’ website resources include:

    • Case studies and scenarios
    • Fact sheets and social story-type graphics
    • A Mandatory Reporting Toolkit
    • Sample forms and templates
    • Self-advocacy resources
  • Child Neurology Foundation

    The Child Neurology Foundation (CNF) is a patient advocacy organization offering tools, education resources, and a network of more than 48 organizations to help children and their families living with neurologic conditions find social services and emotional support.

    CNF’s Family Support Program helps families navigate the journey of being a caregiver of a child with a neurologic condition. Families can connect with trained staff who will listen and help with:

    • Learning about a child neurology disorder and clinical trials
    • Connecting to disease-specific organizations
    • Talking to another parent
    • Navigating insurance and more

    See the CNF Family Support Program flyer to learn more. You can request help online or by calling (859) 551-4977.

  • FIRST.IL Mental Health Program

    FIRST.IL is a program of the Illinois Department of Human Services/Division of Mental Health. It is a specialized treatment approach that helps individuals who are between the ages of 14 to 40 and who have had a treated or untreated psychotic illness for no more than 18 months.

    The program aims to reduce the symptoms of psychotic illnesses, improve individual and family functioning, promote recovery, reduce the chance of relapse and more.

    Eligible diagnoses are schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, schizophreniform disorder or other specified/unspecified schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder with psychotic features, major depressive disorder with psychotic features and PTSD with dissociative symptoms.

    Individuals can call the FIRST.IL agency in their service area for an assessment. If the agency determines that FIRST.IL treatment is appropriate, they will expedite an appointment with their team psychiatrist.

  • Travel Guide for Children with Medical Complexity

    Traveling with a child with medical complexity can be challenging. With extra planning, a family vacation can be a memorable and enjoyable experience. This travel guide from the Courageous Parents Network offers practical advice on choosing a location, what and how to pack the medical supplies your child needs, tips for traveling by car and airplane, and what precautions to take should your child have a medical emergency while on vacation.

    The guide is available in English and Spanish.

  • DSCC’s Planning Your Education & Transition for Life After High School Tip Sheet

    You play a big role in making sure you get the special education services you need. The Division of Specialized Care for Children (DSCC) created this tip sheet to help youth with special healthcare needs and their families learn more about school meetings, work and independence after high school.

    The tip sheet includes a transition planning checklist and information on:

    • Participating in your Individualized Education Program (IEP) meetings
    • Speaking up about your interests, strengths and skills
    • Feeling confident by knowing your rights

    DSCC’s Planning Your Education & Transition for Life After High School tip sheet in English

    DSCC’s Planning Your Education & Transition for Life After High School tip sheet in Spanish

  • National Down Syndrome Society

    The National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS) aims to empower individuals with Down syndrome and their families by driving policy change, providing resources, engaging with local communities and shifting public perceptions.

    Its resources include information on Down syndrome across the lifespan as well as in the areas of aging, caregiving, education, employment, health and more.

  • DSCC’s Using Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to Get Ready for Your Future Tip Sheet

    The Division of Specialized Care for Children (DSCC) created this tip sheet to help youth with special healthcare needs and their families learn more about Supplemental Security Income (SSI). SSI can help pay for food, clothing and housing needs.  It also helps you keep your medical benefits.

    The tip sheet includes:

    • Steps for applying for SSI
    • Work incentives
    • Where to look for more information

    DSCC’s Using Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to Get Ready for Your Future Tip Sheet in English

    DSCC’s Using Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to Get Ready for Your Future Tip Sheet in Spanish

  • DSCC’s Self-Care Assessment for Parents/Caregivers of Youth with Intellectual/Development Disabilities

    DSCC’s Self-Care Assessment for Parents/Caregivers of Youth with Intellectual/Development Disabilities is designed to help caregivers of young adults (ages 18-25) assess the young adult’s ability to care for their own health. The assessment will help provide information about what your young adult already knows about their health and areas where you/they need to learn more.

    If a young adult is able to fill out this information independently, they should complete the young adult version of this form instead.

    Self-Care Assessment for Parents/Caregivers of Young Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities in English

    Self-Care Assessment for Parents/Caregivers of Young Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities in Spanish